Hidden Blessings

Scene Description:
It is August 17, 1805, Camp Fortunate, Shoshone camp. After a long and arduous trek, Sacajawea’s uncle (brother) Chief Cameahwait, tells her she cannot stay with her people because she has a child and belongs to the “white man.” This is the darkest, most hurtful moment in the young woman’s life. She’s given up everything to get back home. When she was first taken by the Hidatsa, her life was harsh as a slave, but things got better, she developed a friendship with Otter Woman, and she was safe, warm and fed. Her choice to go on this harrowing journey was motivated by love for the future husband she’d left behind. Until this very moment, she truly believed he would surely be waiting, no matter what, and he would want her back. It was hard to see the blessing…

There are many horrendous experiences in Sacajawea’s story that would cause most people today to give up. Hiking for 26 days in the pouring rain, without cover, and carrying a crying baby on her back, was not for the faint-of-heart. Many people today could not imagine a life without running water or an electric stove. They’d be devastated without a roof over their head, a TV or the latest cell phone in their hand. Today, our day-to-day needs are taken for granted, and without even the simplest modern convenience, many have believed their life was over – with nothing to live for.

Blog Hidden Blessings
Artwork by Marcia K. Moore, Production Artist

But, our greatest strength is our inner fortitude, our ability to spiritually see beyond our current experience, good or bad, and know that in truth our every need is taken care of – even the birds of the air are clothed in splendor. Yes, there are consequences to our decisions, and, unfortunately, the decisions others make for us. But, Sacajawea had a driving force within to push her toward the unknown. And, when she realized she could not stay, it moved her to another place. She could have ignored Cameahwait’s words, with great heartache ahead, or she could have listened to her intuition, her Spirit’s call, and walked on, believing in faith there was a greater purpose…

Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, shows us something if we are open to see.  If Sacajawea had made a different choice and stayed with her people anyway, she probably would not have been an icon of history and we would not have heard her message of Oneness and Love through this story today.

The Indigenous truth, “The end is the beginning,” creates a continuous circle, which is part of Nature. It will not and cannot be broken, it is infinite. Our experiences in life cause us to make choices. When we dwell on our heartache and needs “as lacking,” we miss what is there for us, and we hide our own blessings – blessings that may extend to future generations. ~ Spirit Wind

“A strong woman is one who deeply loves. Fiercely, her tears flow as abundantly as her laughter. A strong woman is both soft and powerful. She is both practical and spiritual. A strong woman in her essence is a gift to the world.”  ~Native American saying