The Wonders of Spirit Guide the Wonders of Life

Scene Description from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher: 
It’s January 1806 — the explorers will soon leave the Great Northwest. But, they must make one last trek to the beach where a massive whale has washed ashore, hoping to retrieve blubber for fuel. The night before, Sacajawea is adamant she must be allowed to finally see the ocean after coming so far on the journey. She proclaims with passion, “It would be too hard not to see the Great Water and now the big fish…” Captain Clark agrees. As they traverse the 1000 foot high Tillamook Head, a massive basalt lava flow connecting one beach to the other, the girl is awed with Creator’s wonders. Though she does not know just how important this very trail is to her total Being…

As history records, Tillamook Head is a massive volcanic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia River 15 million years ago. It came to rest along a beach of the Great Water, south of the mouth of the river.

Williams Clark’s journal tells us that Sacajawea hiked with him and a small group of explorers over this high rock to Cannon Beach, where the “Big Fish” washed ashore.

In the screenplay, as Sacajawea reaches the top of this 1000 foot high trek, she stands in awe of the infinite beauty. It is here she remembers the wisdom from her uncle (brother), “Boinair, your spirit is not bound, it is free.”

windcatcher
Near Tillamook Head and Cannon Beach, Oregon

While researching Tillamook Head, the most amazing revelation captured us and affirmed Creator’s Spirit in all things for Sacajawea… spiritually and historically, without time or space. For what we learned was the basaltic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia millions of years ago, came to the same spot where Sacajawea was to be in 1806.

The absolute miracle is that this lava originated in Idaho, Sacajawea’s home! As she carried out her ultimate purpose to pray at the Great Water, spirit surrounded her with an energy source that touched her very core – it was the energy from her People and home, right under her feet, that flowed through the basalt rock she traversed.

Though Sacajawea did not know the geology, she did recognize the power, because she was taught to listen to her intuition and use the energy that was drawn around her life through the Infinite Wonders of Spirit.

ONWARD!
Spirit Wind

 

 

~ Descriptions and content from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, are protected under a copyright from the U.S. Copyright Office and the Writer’s Guild of America/west.

Teaser Sneak Peek on FB Private Screening!

After such an incredible day of shooting, we now have a teaser reel we believe is worthy of the Spirit of Sacajawea and this production!

At this time, we are only showing the teaser to private individuals and to investors (not for public viewing). But we will be posting it on our Facebook group “Sacajawea Private Screening” this coming TUESDAY (4-16-19).

If you are not a member, please join the group at: https://lnkd.in/gSdt_4S (requires a facebook profile) – Since it is for “Private Screenings,” you will not be able to share the video, so if you have friends who want to see this beautiful 2 1/2 minute presentation, please invite them to join us, too.

We also have information on how you, or someone you know, can become more involved in the Sacajawea production. Please feel free to connect with us on this website contact page! Let’s soar to NEW HEIGHTS! It truly is a journey of a lifetime!

Teaser Reel announcement

Let It Flow

Scene Description: 
It is April 1805. The corps has left Fort Mandan and the icy winter behind. Everything is changing after the snow-melt, as nature comes alive. New leaves poke from tree branches, grass grows before their eyes and wildflowers bud and bloom. The long days are filled with soldiers pushing the packed boats up the Missouri River toward the unseen promise of the mountains. Some of the men walk on the banks pulling the boats with ropes through calm and rough waters – pushing and pulling, maneuvering the load. It is exhausting.

Sacajawea walks on the shore with Pomp in his cradleboard on her back… When she cannot go another step she rides, letting the soldiers pull her canoe against the current. At times the river is simply a small stream of water trickling toward them from the hills, causing the men to drag the boats across the dry and rocky terrain. The struggle is real and the destination is unknown, the circumstances are nearly unbearable…

rainbow river

Final Thoughts:
There is a powerful metaphor for life in the screenplay, SACAJAWEA, The Windcatcher. One might ask, “Why didn’t the soldiers take horses from Saint Louis to Fort Mandan to the mountains, then make canoes and sail down the river, with the current, to the Great Water?” As with life, they didn’t understand the terms of the journey, they didn’t know what was ahead, they didn’t realize the land was so massive, the mountains so high and the trek so dangerous. Life never gives us all the facts upfront. Sacajawea and these men pushed and pulled their way, struggled and labored with chaos lurking around every corner.

Finally, they left their boats behind, bargained for horses with the Shoshone and traversed the treacherous, snow-capped mountains to the other side. Weak, starving and vulnerable, the explorers came across the Nez Perce village. They did not know if the tribe was friendly. But the Nez Perce ended up helping them build canoes for the downward flow to the mighty Columbia River – and, ultimately, to the Great Water.

No one’s life is easy, we must go through countless trials, poor decisions, undeserved pain, but there should be no regrets and no judgment. Miraculously, when we least expect it, someone comes along to help… Our greatest strength is to have faith and believe in the journey, for that belief is stronger than any foe. We all push and pull our way, but when we learn to let it go, we begin to recognize the miracles, and our love, like the Great Water, flows out to the entire world. ~ Spirit Wind