The Eagle’s Tree

A great vision is needed and the one who has it must follow it as the eagle seeks the deepest blue of the sky. ~Ta Shunke Witko

In an eagle there is all the wisdom of the world. ~Lame Deer

I am in awe and wonder at Indigenous wisdom and I am so very grateful… During the four years of writing the screenplay, Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, I noticed a bald eagle flying back and forth, nearly every day, across the field outside my office window. He was there in the morning and the evening, always landing on the very top branch of the same evergreen tree. He would slowly turn to survey his domain, so regal, so empowered by his surroundings. It was a mystical wonder, though at the time I did not fully understand why…

But, my research began to show the way. I learned that many Indigenous cultures give names, or take their names, from something they have accomplished or something that has meaning to their personal or spiritual lives. Historical records show that SacaGawea’s name was originally given to her by the Hidatsa people who captured her. The meaning of her name was, “Bird Woman.” So, I knew the birds, the raptors, the flying beings were significant somehow in her life. The Hidatsa saw it and honored it, so her story must honor it, too. I came to understand and believe the eagle was showing me.

This energy within the Sacajawea story grew and evolved as the words came to life, as her character and person began to come forth, and as more magnificent wonders were shown to us as we continued to walk. Symbolically, in the story, the eagle became Sacajawea’s Spiritual guide. He waited at the top of the trees above her… he came to her when she called. And her spirit was embraced, in her heartache, by his tender care.

MYSTICAL WONDERS: While writing this post, I wanted to find a picture of the tree the eagle landed on, near my home. I had to search through the photos from years and years ago… suddenly I was taken aback, in awe. I remembered snapping the picture and at the time not thinking about the tree. It was the rainbow that attracted me then. But this is how Spirit works, it gets our attention… and if we listen and act on our intuition (even though we don’t know everything), later – even years later – the reasons are revealed. You see, in this photo, it is not the rainbow that is the true meaning for us today as I write about the eagle. It is the eagle’s tree and how creation’s rainbow shines upon it. It is an affirmation that we can claim, at this moment, that we are on the right path.

We are truly humbled and blessed by these intricate, Spiritual messages that continue to shine a brilliant light on Indigenous beliefs, cultures and traditions that benefit us all. Through these revelations, I believe Sacajawea is showing us something remarkable, a healing power that will lift up people of the world. It is not about the color of our skin, our ethnicity or anything else – it is about our Universal Spirituality and remembering our Oneness with each other, and respect for the Earth.

Let us soar together on eagle’s wings…

Here are some of the many eagles that have personally led us on this powerful path:

The Wonders of Spirit, the Wonders of Life

Scene Description from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher: 
It’s January 1806 — the explorers will soon leave the Great Northwest. But, they must make one last trek to the beach where a massive whale has washed ashore, hoping to retrieve blubber for fuel. The night before, Sacajawea is adamant she must be allowed to finally see the ocean after coming so far on the journey. She proclaims with passion, “It would be too hard not to see the Great Water and now the big fish…” Captain Clark agrees. As they traverse the 1000 foot high Tillamook Head, a massive basalt lava flow connecting one beach to the other, the girl is awed with Creator’s wonders. Though she does not know just how important this very trail is to her total Being…

As history records, Tillamook Head is a massive volcanic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia River 15 million years ago. It came to rest along a beach of the Great Water, south of the mouth of the river.

Williams Clark’s journal tells us that Sacajawea hiked with him and a small group of explorers over this high rock to Cannon Beach, where the “Big Fish” washed ashore.

In the screenplay, as Sacajawea reaches the top of this 1000 foot high trek, she stands in awe of the infinite beauty. It is here she remembers the wisdom from her uncle (brother), “Boinair, your spirit is not bound, it is free.”

windcatcher
Near Tillamook Head and Cannon Beach, Oregon

While researching Tillamook Head, the most amazing revelation captured us and affirmed Creator’s Spirit in all things for Sacajawea… spiritually and historically, without time or space. For what we learned was the basaltic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia millions of years ago, came to the same spot where Sacajawea was to be in 1806.

The absolute miracle is that this lava originated in Idaho, Sacajawea’s home! As she carried out her ultimate purpose to pray at the Great Water, spirit surrounded her with an energy source that touched her very core – it was the energy from her People and home, right under her feet, that flowed through the basalt rock she traversed.

Though Sacajawea did not know the geology, she did recognize the power, because she was taught to listen to her intuition and use the energy that was drawn around her life through the Infinite Wonders of Spirit.

ONWARD!
Spirit Wind

~ Descriptions and content from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, are protected under a copyright from the U.S. Copyright Office and the Writer’s Guild of America/west.