Power in Diversity

Scene Description from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher:  As the story of Sacajawea unfolds across this harrowing trek, we get to know the characters. Their spirits and energies move together with surprising unity, despite the circumstances. They are an uncommon and diverse group considering it is 1805, when African Americans and Native Americans are treated as slaves and many of the soldiers are of “mixed blood.” Yet, there is something compelling about this snapshot-in-time and the adventure they find themselves in, together.

Explorers and Native Americans

Instead of focusing on a particular scene, we are embracing the relationship between three unlikely counterparts: Sacajawea, Captain Clark and Clark’s black slave, York. Life’s journey for Sacajawea and York mirror one another as they know what it is like to be abused, sold or traded at a white man’s whim. In their diversity, their relationship is powerful because they have seen much pain, yet they are both compassionate and caring to all, no matter what their race or status.

Sacajawea is a peacemaker and a guide. By finding wild foods and medicinal plants, she cares for them all. Clark is Sacajawea’s protector on several occasions, and York helps her in many ways, especially with her child. York is also Captain Clark’s protector, and Clark trusts him, maybe for the first time in his life, to carry a gun and scout alone to assure the safety of the group. There is great respect between them all and we see it play out even past the end of the journey…

We can learn much from the Corps of Discovery. Certainly, the literal lessons of survival and pursuit, driven by a will to live and the courage to make it over the ominous mountains. But, the character snapshot captured in the Sacajawea film, has so many more implications to who we are as Spiritual Beings.

If this small group of diverse individuals can move beyond their prejudice and ignorance of the time period, even for just a little while, and come together for incredible success, then we absolutely know acceptance of diversity has the power to change the world.

It is our fervent hope that those watching this majestic film one day, will embrace something that goes beyond the literal, something that is not defined by the frail mind of opinion and judgment. But, instead, that we all will recognize the infinite vibration and energy that is already here, waiting for us to AWAKEN, calling for us to come together. Indeed, believing in who we really are and showing us the way – if we will just embrace it and listen.

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.”—Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Wonders of Spirit Guide the Wonders of Life

Scene Description from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher: 
It’s January 1806 — the explorers will soon leave the Great Northwest. But, they must make one last trek to the beach where a massive whale has washed ashore, hoping to retrieve blubber for fuel. The night before, Sacajawea is adamant she must be allowed to finally see the ocean after coming so far on the journey. She proclaims with passion, “It would be too hard not to see the Great Water and now the big fish…” Captain Clark agrees. As they traverse the 1000 foot high Tillamook Head, a massive basalt lava flow connecting one beach to the other, the girl is awed with Creator’s wonders. Though she does not know just how important this very trail is to her total Being…

As history records, Tillamook Head is a massive volcanic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia River 15 million years ago. It came to rest along a beach of the Great Water, south of the mouth of the river.

Williams Clark’s journal tells us that Sacajawea hiked with him and a small group of explorers over this high rock to Cannon Beach, where the “Big Fish” washed ashore.

In the screenplay, as Sacajawea reaches the top of this 1000 foot high trek, she stands in awe of the infinite beauty. It is here she remembers the wisdom from her uncle (brother), “Boinair, your spirit is not bound, it is free.”

windcatcher
Near Tillamook Head and Cannon Beach, Oregon

While researching Tillamook Head, the most amazing revelation captured us and affirmed Creator’s Spirit in all things for Sacajawea… spiritually and historically, without time or space. For what we learned was the basaltic lava flow that traveled down the Columbia millions of years ago, came to the same spot where Sacajawea was to be in 1806.

The absolute miracle is that this lava originated in Idaho, Sacajawea’s home! As she carried out her ultimate purpose to pray at the Great Water, spirit surrounded her with an energy source that touched her very core – it was the energy from her People and home, right under her feet, that flowed through the basalt rock she traversed.

Though Sacajawea did not know the geology, she did recognize the power, because she was taught to listen to her intuition and use the energy that was drawn around her life through the Infinite Wonders of Spirit.

ONWARD!
Spirit Wind

 

 

~ Descriptions and content from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, are protected under a copyright from the U.S. Copyright Office and the Writer’s Guild of America/west.

Sacajawea was a watcher of her heart

What will we learn from life? Will we just exist day to day or will we venture out, will we walk with courage into the unknown? What are the lessons we learn from Sacajawea as she set out on her journey of discovery? A real journey, yes — a metaphoric journey, absolutely. Not lessons of the mind, but spiritual lessons, written on the heart.

Sacajawea the movie LLCIn 2013, I had an experience that literally changed my life. At the time, I was on an intense spiritual journey, tearing down the walls and barriers I had carried from my life, pouring out and filling up with things that required Belief. Not belief in an idea, but Spirit-driven belief in what I did not fully understand.

This particular afternoon I was walking back from the mailbox, thinking what a beautiful day… when I had a strange sensation. Yes, I was walking, but I was seeing “me” from above me. I saw my facial expressions, my movements, my physical self, walking along… I saw what others see. I saw something else, too, it was energy and light all around me — I could see inside, as if transparent. I recognized a deep longing to know Truth and Love in my life, and a revelation: I am so much more than the physical self.

From that time on, I began to be a “watcher” of my heart, assessing my thoughts and actions as a human being, inside and outside myself. I began to focus on changing the things that did not, and do not, move me toward Truth. Even now, sometimes it’s hard to know what’s good and what’s bad, right and wrong. I make mistakes… But the answers are already written and revealed through belief. It takes courage to be a watcher, for we must squarely face what we see.

Over the last 14 years, Sacajawea has become a vital part of my walk. She has shown me many things in my life (even before I knew), she has given me words and kept me going when the path became hard on the journey. She has never made it easy for me because she understands the magical purpose of darkness and how it reveals the more-powerful light. It is a light we must choose to embrace.

As a Native American, Sacajawea understood the power of intuition, she respected her Oneness with all things and the earth, and she was the watcher of her own heart — she was wise, brave and a visionary. Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, has traveled far to reach us. It is part of the world’s enlightenment, and the change we seek — a deep longing for Truth and Love. Let us wake up our spirits, let us prepare, and let us be ready to listen to the messages from the ages.

ONWARD, we have no fear.

Jane