The Eagle’s Tree

A great vision is needed and the one who has it must follow it as the eagle seeks the deepest blue of the sky. ~Ta Shunke Witko

In an eagle there is all the wisdom of the world. ~Lame Deer

I am in awe and wonder at Indigenous wisdom and I am so very grateful… During the four years of writing the screenplay, Sacajawea, The Windcatcher, I noticed a bald eagle flying back and forth, nearly every day, across the field outside my office window. He was there in the morning and the evening, always landing on the very top branch of the same evergreen tree. He would slowly turn to survey his domain, so regal, so empowered by his surroundings. It was a mystical wonder, though at the time I did not fully understand why…

But, my research began to show the way. I learned that many Indigenous cultures give names, or take their names, from something they have accomplished or something that has meaning to their personal or spiritual lives. Historical records show that SacaGawea’s name was originally given to her by the Hidatsa people who captured her. The meaning of her name was, “Bird Woman.” So, I knew the birds, the raptors, the flying beings were significant somehow in her life. The Hidatsa saw it and honored it, so her story must honor it, too. I came to understand and believe the eagle was showing me.

This energy within the Sacajawea story grew and evolved as the words came to life, as her character and person began to come forth, and as more magnificent wonders were shown to us as we continued to walk. Symbolically, in the story, the eagle became Sacajawea’s Spiritual guide. He waited at the top of the trees above her… he came to her when she called. And her spirit was embraced, in her heartache, by his tender care.

MYSTICAL WONDERS: While writing this post, I wanted to find a picture of the tree the eagle landed on, near my home. I had to search through the photos from years and years ago… suddenly I was taken aback, in awe. I remembered snapping the picture and at the time not thinking about the tree. It was the rainbow that attracted me then. But this is how Spirit works, it gets our attention… and if we listen and act on our intuition (even though we don’t know everything), later – even years later – the reasons are revealed. You see, in this photo, it is not the rainbow that is the true meaning for us today as I write about the eagle. It is the eagle’s tree and how creation’s rainbow shines upon it. It is an affirmation that we can claim, at this moment, that we are on the right path.

We are truly humbled and blessed by these intricate, Spiritual messages that continue to shine a brilliant light on Indigenous beliefs, cultures and traditions that benefit us all. Through these revelations, I believe Sacajawea is showing us something remarkable, a healing power that will lift up people of the world. It is not about the color of our skin, our ethnicity or anything else – it is about our Universal Spirituality and remembering our Oneness with each other, and respect for the Earth.

Let us soar together on eagle’s wings…

Here are some of the many eagles that have personally led us on this powerful path:

Power in Diversity

Scene Description from Sacajawea, The Windcatcher:  As the story of Sacajawea unfolds across this harrowing trek, we get to know the characters. Their spirits and energies move together with surprising unity, despite the circumstances. They are an uncommon and diverse group considering it is 1805, when African Americans and Native Americans are treated as slaves and many of the soldiers are of “mixed blood.” Yet, there is something compelling about this snapshot-in-time and the adventure they find themselves in, together.

Explorers and Native Americans

Instead of focusing on a particular scene, we are embracing the relationship between three unlikely counterparts: Sacajawea, Captain Clark and Clark’s black slave, York. Life’s journey for Sacajawea and York mirror one another as they know what it is like to be abused, sold or traded at a white man’s whim. In their diversity, their relationship is powerful because they have seen much pain, yet they are both compassionate and caring to all, no matter what their race or status.

Sacajawea is a peacemaker and a guide. By finding wild foods and medicinal plants, she cares for them all. Clark is Sacajawea’s protector on several occasions, and York helps her in many ways, especially with her child. York is also Captain Clark’s protector, and Clark trusts him, maybe for the first time in his life, to carry a gun and scout alone to assure the safety of the group. There is great respect between them all and we see it play out even past the end of the journey…

We can learn much from the Corps of Discovery. Certainly, the literal lessons of survival and pursuit, driven by a will to live and the courage to make it over the ominous mountains. But, the character snapshot captured in the Sacajawea film, has so many more implications to who we are as Spiritual Beings.

If this small group of diverse individuals can move beyond their prejudice and ignorance of the time period, even for just a little while, and come together for incredible success, then we absolutely know acceptance of diversity has the power to change the world.

It is our fervent hope that those watching this majestic film one day, will embrace something that goes beyond the literal, something that is not defined by the frail mind of opinion and judgment. But, instead, that we all will recognize the infinite vibration and energy that is already here, waiting for us to AWAKEN, calling for us to come together. Indeed, believing in who we really are and showing us the way – if we will just embrace it and listen.

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.”—Martin Luther King, Jr.

Awakening from “Lewis & Clark”

Your woman who accompanied you [on] that long, dangerous and fatiguing route to the Pacific Ocean and back deserved a greater reward for her attention and services on that route than we had in our power to give her.”    

 ~ Captain William Clark

At a time when Indigenous women were not respected by many people, and their voices were not heard, how could this Shoshoni girl even be remembered? Yet, William Clark awakened to something greater in Sacajawea, according to his words.

People have tried to marginalize Sacajawea’s involvement on the Lewis & Clark Expedition by making her seem inconsequential. While others have glorified her as a  “Guide to the Pacific,” when she had never actually been across the great mountains.

Sacajawea was a guide, but not in the sense many want to portray…

nothing stops love

Most of the explorers of the Lewis & Clark Expedition could only understand their literal world. But, Spirit was at work in a mysterious way – leading, guiding, protecting, answering prayers, moving them onward toward an infinite quest.

Despite the fear of certain danger, the explorers were ordered to encounter Native People, and record their traditions, cultures and languages… Not knowing Sacajawea believed they would be safe because, in faith, she wore the paint of her People that told other tribes they had come in peace.

And, even though they had no idea where to go, they were ordered to map the waterways and land to create a trade route to the Pacific… Not knowing Sacajawea, through her Indigenous wisdom, prayed for them on the smoke to the Great Father so they would find the way.

Through great uncertainty, they were desperate to find the Shoshoni village and trade for horses to cross the nearly impassable mountains… Not knowing, after being kidnapped, Sacajawea had been living her prayers for four years – that the Great Father would guide her home.

They were there as soldiers, on the path to western expansion… Not knowing Sacajawea’s innate acceptance of a Call toward her greater destiny was at work – a destiny we now know, was for today.

At the time of her physical life, Sacajawea became a Light for Lewis and Clark. This diverse group of men did not know their exploration would open a very dark time for Indigenous people in America. And, no other soul in all of history stood on the edge of that darkness – but a young woman, Sacajawea, with her face toward the Light.

Indeed, she was a guide… and from that empowering historical moment, her flame has flickered in the Spirit winds. We have witnessed her brilliance in such mysterious ways. We have been awakened by truly magical signs and undeniable wonders.

And, what we have come to know, it was Sacajawea’s belief in things unseen, through time and space, taught by her People and guided by the Great Spirit, that called her from that journey so long ago, to Now. She accepted her Calling and her Destiny, for she saw beyond her own hurt to embrace and share a message of Oneness and true Love with the world.

Sacajawea, The Windcatcher,
is an Awakening!

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Red Dress Day – Let us Never Forget!

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When Sacajawea was just 12 years old she was kidnapped from her family. She experienced abuse at a young age, as a slave – and then, she was forced to become the “woman” of an old French fur trader. Sacajawea had his son when she was 16! What are the chances we would remember a little Shoshoni girl today? How has she infiltrated our world and shown her Spirit in so many ways for generations?

Sacajawea’s time is NOW – and her story is for all people of the earth. Her spirit is strong, her energy ignites us for a cause, her destiny will be fulfilled when her story is told. She comes like the wind and nothing will ever be the same.

On this Red Dress Day, we remember all the Indigenous women who have gone missing or murdered. Let us wear red in their memory, and in the memory of Sacajawea. It is her “LIFE” we honor today and all the women of the world.

ONWARD, we Believe!
Jane