Awakening from “Lewis & Clark”

Your woman who accompanied you [on] that long, dangerous and fatiguing route to the Pacific Ocean and back deserved a greater reward for her attention and services on that route than we had in our power to give her.”    

 ~ Captain William Clark

At a time when Indigenous women were not respected by many people, and their voices were not heard, how could this Shoshoni girl even be remembered? Yet, William Clark awakened to something greater in Sacajawea, according to his words.

People have tried to marginalize Sacajawea’s involvement on the Lewis & Clark Expedition by making her seem inconsequential. While others have glorified her as a  “Guide to the Pacific,” when she had never actually been across the great mountains.

Sacajawea was a guide, but not in the sense many want to portray…

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Most of the explorers of the Lewis & Clark Expedition could only understand their literal world. But, Spirit was at work in a mysterious way – leading, guiding, protecting, answering prayers, moving them onward toward an infinite quest.

Despite the fear of certain danger, the explorers were ordered to encounter Native People, and record their traditions, cultures and languages… Not knowing Sacajawea believed they would be safe because, in faith, she wore the paint of her People that told other tribes they had come in peace.

And, even though they had no idea where to go, they were ordered to map the waterways and land to create a trade route to the Pacific… Not knowing Sacajawea, through her Indigenous wisdom, prayed for them on the smoke to the Great Father so they would find the way.

Through great uncertainty, they were desperate to find the Shoshoni village and trade for horses to cross the nearly impassable mountains… Not knowing, after being kidnapped, Sacajawea had been living her prayers for four years – that the Great Father would guide her home.

They were there as soldiers, on the path to western expansion… Not knowing Sacajawea’s innate acceptance of a Call toward her greater destiny was at work – a destiny we now know, was for today.

At the time of her physical life, Sacajawea became a Light for Lewis and Clark. This diverse group of men did not know their exploration would open a very dark time for Indigenous people in America. And, no other soul in all of history stood on the edge of that darkness – but a young woman, Sacajawea, with her face toward the Light.

Indeed, she was a guide… and from that empowering historical moment, her flame has flickered in the Spirit winds. We have witnessed her brilliance in such mysterious ways. We have been awakened by truly magical signs and undeniable wonders.

And, what we have come to know, it was Sacajawea’s belief in things unseen, through time and space, taught by her People and guided by the Great Spirit, that called her from that journey so long ago, to Now. She accepted her Calling and her Destiny, for she saw beyond her own hurt to embrace and share a message of Oneness and true Love with the world.

Sacajawea, The Windcatcher,
is an Awakening!

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Red Dress Day – Let us Never Forget!

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When Sacajawea was just 12 years old she was kidnapped from her family. She experienced abuse at a young age, as a slave – and then, she was forced to become the “woman” of an old French fur trader. Sacajawea had his son when she was 16! What are the chances we would remember a little Shoshoni girl today? How has she infiltrated our world and shown her Spirit in so many ways for generations?

Sacajawea’s time is NOW – and her story is for all people of the earth. Her spirit is strong, her energy ignites us for a cause, her destiny will be fulfilled when her story is told. She comes like the wind and nothing will ever be the same.

On this Red Dress Day, we remember all the Indigenous women who have gone missing or murdered. Let us wear red in their memory, and in the memory of Sacajawea. It is her “LIFE” we honor today and all the women of the world.

ONWARD, we Believe!
Jane